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FISHING
Separate licenses are required for salt and freshwater sport fishing.
Fishing is permitted in National Parks provided you obtain a special
fishing license.
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HUNTING
REVOLVERS, PISTOLS AND FULL AUTOMATIC FIREARMS ARE
PROHIBITED ENTRY INTO CANADA.
Contact Canada Customs or RCMP for details before bringing
firearms into Canada.
Hunters can obtain provincial licensing details from the Ministry
of Water, Land and Air Protection offices, government agents or
any authorized licensing office. All hunters should carry a current
copy of the BC Hunting and Trapping Regulations synopsis.
A BC hunting license does not give authority to carry a firearm.
Ministry of Environment www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/wild/hunting/htm
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FIREARMS IN CANADA
You must be at least 18 years of age to bring a firearm into
Canada, and you must declare each firearm you are bringing into
Canada. As a visitor, you must comply with the Canadian Storage,
Display, Transportation and Handling of Firearms by Individuals
Regulations.
To enter Canada with a restricted firearm, individuals must obtain
an Authorization to Transport (ATT) from a provincial or territorial
Chief Firearms Officer (CDO) before arriving at the border. For
further information regarding the transportation of firearms in
Canada, please contact the Canadian Firearms Centre Toll Free:
1-800-731-4000 from anywhere in Canada or the U.S., or
506-624-5380 from any other locations, or visit the webpage:
www.cfc.gc.ca
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ANIMAL COMPANIONS
All pets must be accompanied by their owners when entering
Canada. Owners of dogs and cats must bring a certificate issued
by a licensed American or Canadian veterinarian clearly identifying
the pet and certifying that it has been vaccinated against rabies
some time during the previous 36 months. An exception is made
for puppies or kittens that are younger than three months old.
Always keep pets on a leash outside the vehicle, as it is incredibly
difficult to locate them if they wander away, and various species of
wildlife will attack them if provoked.
Seeing-eye dogs are allowed into Canada without restriction.
Canadian law also guarantees that anyone using a seeing-eye dog
may bring them into restaurants, hotels and other businesses.
For further information on the entry of pets, please contact:
Toll Free: 1-888-732-6222 (Canada/US)
Tel: (604) 666-9240 or www.inspection.gc.ca
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METRIC SYSTEM
Canada uses the metric system of weights and measures. This
is especially significant for American drivers as speed limits,
distances and fuel prices are all posted in unfamiliar terms. Here
are some handy comparisons that will help you with Canadian
signs and fuel prices. A kilometre (km) is approximately six-tenths
(0.6) of a mile. Use the following formula to estimate speed limits
& distances:
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I DECLARE
After each trip outside Canada of 48 hours or longer, you are
entitled to a special duty rate of 7% under the Most Favored
Nation (MFN) tariff treatment in addition to your personal
exemption. The rate applies only to goods that accompany
you, that do not qualify for duty-free entry under the NORTH
AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT (NAFTA) and that are worth
up to CAN $300. more than your personal exemption of CAN
$400. or CAN $700. The rate doesn't not apply to tobacco
products or alcoholic beverages. You still have to pay any GST/HST
that applies. In some Provinces, we also collect the provincial sales
tax (PST).
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RESTRICTIONS ON ITEMS FOR PERSONAL USE
Alcohol Those meeting the age requirement of British Columbia
(19) may bring in either: 1.14 litres (40oz) of liquor or 1.5 litres
(51 oz) or 2 x 750 ml of wine, or in lieu, 8.5 litres (288 oz) of beer
or ale.
Tobacco Visitors meeting the age requirement of British
Columbia (19) may bring the following amounts of tobacco into
Canada without paying duty: Up to 50 cigars 200 cigarettes
200 grams (7oz) of tobacco
This does not apply to merchandise or articles intended for other
persons or for sale.
Drugs for Medical Use Prescription drugs should be clearly
identified and carried in the original packaging with a label
specifying both what they are and that they are being used under
prescription. It is also a good idea to bring a copy of your
prescription and a contact number for your doctor. Diabetics and
others who must bring syringes with them should carry some
evidence of their need for use.
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COMMUNICATIONS
If you have an American operator's license, you may use your
aircraft, marine or amateur radio while visiting Canada without a
Canadian license. All other types of radio transmitting stations may
only be used in Canada if accompanied by a letter or registration
from Industry Canada's Radio Regulatory and Broadcasting
Branch.
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HEALTH INSURANCE & HOSPITALS
The vast majority of Canadian hospitals are publicly managed and
rates are set by provincial and hospital authorities. Your regular
health insurance will likely offer the extended coverage while you
are in Canada. However, it is always wise to purchase extra travel
insurance before embarking on any trip.
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PROVINCIAL SALES TAX
British Columbia has a provincial sales tax of 7%. In addition, the
GST, or Goods and Services Tax, is a 5% federal tax which applies
to most goods and services available in Canada.
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CREDIT CARD & BANK MACHINES
Major credit cards such as VISA, MasterCard and American Express
are widely accepted in Canada. Keep in mind your financial
institution at home will automatically make the currency exchange
before you receive your monthly statement. You can also use any
bankcard for the Interac system with just about every automatic
banking machine in Canada.
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VISITORS FROM THE USA
When traveling to Canada, U.S. Citizens should carry more than a
driver's license a birth certificate, a resident alien card or a green
card together with a passport is now recommended.
Travel by air January 8, 2007
Passports, NEXUS Air cards, or Merchant Mariner Documents will
be required for all air travel from within the Western Hemisphere
for citizens of the United States, Canada, Mexico and Bermuda.
Travel by land or sea - January 1, 2008
It is anticipated that U.S. citizens traveling between the U.S. and
Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean and
Bermuda by land or sea (including ferries) may be required to
present a valid U.S. Passport, or other document as determined by
the Department of Homeland Security.
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VISITORS FROM OTHER COUNTRIES
All persons coming into Canada as visitors, other than American
citizens, must be in possession of a valid national passport or other
recognized travel documents and visas if required. Visas must be
obtained in advance from a Canadian Embassy or Canadian
Consulate outside Canada.
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BRINGING GOODS TO CANADA FOR
PERSONAL USE
Most things that visitors bring into Canada for personal use during
their visit will be considered "personal baggage" by Canada
Customs. Some examples are food, fishing tackle, cars, boats and
motors, snowmobiles, fuel, sports equipment, television sets,
musical instruments, computers and cameras.
Visitors are not allowed to carry a weapon, such as a firearm or
mace, or any other device to be used against humans, for self-
defense in Canada. Contact information about the restrictions on
importing firearms is provided in another section on this page.
You may bring bona fide gifts worth up to $60.00 in Canadian
funds each for your friends or family in Canada without paying
duty, provided these do not consist of tobacco or alcoholic
beverages.
When flying into Canada, the following items are NOT
PERMITTED: lighters (except Bic-type lighters), straight razors,
razor blades, box cutters, hatchets, hunting knives, jack knives
(Swiss army knives), meat cleavers and tools such as hammers,
screwdrivers, wrenches, saws, drills, crowbars and heavy tools.
Other prohibited items are ammunition firearms (including toy
guns) sports items such as scuba tanks, golf clubs, baseball
bats, skates, bowling balls, billiard cues, cross bows and
arrows. Also gels, aerosols and other liquids need to be under
100ml/100g (3.4 oz).
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TRANSPORTING GOODS THROUGH CANADA
Americans seeking a convenient route to other parts of the U.S. or
Alaska may bring goods "in transit" (but not handguns) through
Canada. To facilitate your border crossings, you should carry three
copies of a list of all the goods you are bringing with you, including
values and serial numbers if applicable. Consumable goods, e.g.
alcohol, tobacco & food should be packed in containers that can
be recorded and sealed by Canadian Customs at the time of entry.
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PH: (250) 785-4313
9410-100th Street
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PARTS, SALES
CONSIGNMENTS
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Travel Information
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW